Blog 2017-07-05T12:54:16+00:00
ISSA // BLOG
Recent history in words

Does our coaching actually help players learn? (NSCAA Coaching Journal – March 2015)

Does our coaching actually help players learn? (NSCAA Coaching Journal) Darren Laver discusses the concerns with coaching vs learning and the development of Street Soccer. Back to the Future: Is Ancient Wisdom the Way Forward? Darren Laver discusses the concerns with coaching vs learning and the development of Street Soccer. If the aim of coaching is to help players learn then perhaps our coaching methods need to be turned around. Maybe we should adopt a method that supports learning, rather than one that imposes coaching. Perhaps our model should appreciate that the learner dictates the agenda in reality, not the coach or the curriculum. Find the article in the 2015 March/April addition Soccer Journal is the Official Publication of the NSCAA and is one of the few magazines in the world produced exclusively for soccer coaches. Each issue contains technical and tactical articles, news and updates on important events, thoughts from opinion leaders in the sport and features on the interesting people and issues of the game.

By | March 25th, 2015|Categories: Soccer Stories|

The International Street Soccer Association delivers another successful Coaching Award @ Loughborough University

The International Street Soccer Association delivers another successful Coaching Award @ Loughborough University. This is now the 5th year the ISSA have been delivering the Street Soccer Coaching award at Loughborough University. Loughborough University is in the UK’s top 15 University with an international reputation for excellence in teaching, research and sport. “The ISSA has delivered a Street Soccer course as part of our PGCE programme for a number of years and the prospective PE teachers we train have always evaluated the course extremely highly. The tutors engaging style of presentation is central to this, but as this course is delivered towards the end of our programme the students are well informed about, and have experience of many of the critical issues associated with effective teaching and learning, and are therefore quite discerning about the content of the course.  Without fail, the course always provides them with a range of innovative ideas that they instantly recognize as having relevance to teaching Physical Education within a secondary school context.  Standards and expectations on our course are high and the ISSA/CCA never fails to meet these and I have no hesitation in endorsing their work.” Nick Bromell - University Teacher of Physical Education, Loughborough University’ Student Comments “I and many of my colleagues really enjoyed the workshop and thought it was a useful insight into how football can be taught in a different way.  The warm up was particularly interesting, and again something slightly different to most of the practice we have already seen, especially the use of music and interaction with other people. From the people I spoke to, we all felt that we would attempt to try a warm up similar to this in the future” Tom Blandford "I thoroughly enjoyed the course! The atmosphere was brilliant and I gained loads of ideas of how to teach football in school in a different and potentially more enjoyable way. I think I'll also endeavour to include more music in any lesson I teach as I really think it makes learning more fun". Hannah Jarvis

By | March 11th, 2015|Categories: Soccer Stories|

ISSA Street Soccer Training (Creativity)

The FA Coaching Strategy specifically identifies the need to develop coaching programs which improve the creativity of players. Anyone who watches the game will be able to see creativity in players and identify moments of creative flair. However, in order to help foster creativity in players, we need to understand what it is and how it is affected. Why do we need focus on producing creative players? Creativity has been described as the process of developing original ideas that have value. In many walks of life, there is now a distinct movement towards the development of creativity. The reason for this is pretty simple. In our rapidly developing world we need people that can respond to the changing environment. We need people who can find elegant and effective solutions to completely unpredictable events. We don’t know what’s just around the corner. All we actually know about the future is that we know nothing. That’s why so many people in business and commerce are focussed on the need to nurture creativity. The same is true in football. Creative players are those who produce an original skill to meet a completely unpredictable situation in a game. Often in football a moment of skill is not planned, it just ‘appears’ when it is needed. In fact, in football creativity is a double edged sword. As well as helping players provide solutions to unpredictable situations, it also helps them present unique and unpredictable challenges to the opposition. So, why is it that some players are incredibly creative and others are much less creative? Is creativity something people are born with or is it a product of the environment? Can coaching have an effect on a player’s creativity? The weight of opinion amongst experts in this field is that creativity is something people are born with, it is not taught. So does that mean we cannot coach it? Let’s clarify this. Creativity is something we are born with. In fact, creativity is something that everyone is born with. As human beings we are inherently creative. Creativity and imagination are built into every one of us from birth. It doesn’t need to be taught. Picasso said that we are all born artists…the challenge is to remain an artist as we grow up Therefore, in order to nurture creativity we don’t have to find a way of ‘developing’, ‘teaching’ or ‘producing it’. As coaches, our job is simply to allow it to naturally live and grow. We simply have to take away any barriers that might stop it from flourishing. Unfortunately, much of what is done in coaching and educational environments actually has the effect of stifling creativity. “In the first 2 years of life, a child learns to walk and talk….then they are sent to school and told to sit down and shut up”. In society we are schooled not to make mistakes. Our system of education and coaching often reflects this. How many soccer coaches have you heard instructing children not to make mistakes? In [...]

By | February 6th, 2015|Categories: Soccer Stories|

CCA Level 2 Award in Creative Soccer Coaching (Ben Holman)

On completion of my CCA level 2 I had to reflect on my coaching, previous to the course, and ask myself why I had coached the way I did. My conclusion was that previous coaching courses had told me to coach that way and my personal experience of 'old fashioned' coaches had rubbed off on me. After the course I was coaching in a specific while adopting a unique philosophy not because I had been told too but because I thoroughly understood the rational behind the CCA level 2 course content. Darren delivered a course full of valuable information, with high quality examples and provided both scientific and historical rationales. The course was delivered in both practical and classroom based environments to such a high a quality that it made veteran university lecturers look amateur.  The course is a must for any football coach out there regardless of age, and further more, I believe the course is suitable for any sports coach out there and anyone who is trying to develop children in a sporting or non-sporting context. From how to create the optimal learning environment to nurturing creativity in children  and the positives of allowing children autonomy the course covers it all. Ben Holman - Sports Development and Coaching Graduate, Northumbria University'

By | January 28th, 2015|Categories: Soccer Stories|

ISSA Coach Education (Level 1 Award) at University of St Mark & St John

Our students here at the University of St Mark & St John in Plymouth have really benefitted from the ISSA Street Soccer Level 1 over the past few years.  The course is excellently delivered, with an engaging and knowledgeable tutor, who utilises a range of creative teaching resources and methods in order to connect with our young learners.  Our students coach in a variety of environments, from traditional grassroots football clubs, to local authority run community schemes, to professional football club development centres.  All have found this course to be of great use in helping them to promote creativity in both session design, and in the ability/enjoyment of their players . Ryan Thomas (Program Leader for Football Coaching & Development) University of St Mark & St John

By | January 23rd, 2015|Categories: Soccer Stories|

ISSA Street Soccer Training (Creativity)

The FA Coaching Strategy specifically identifies the need to develop coaching programmes which improve the creativity of players. Anyone who watches the game will be able to see creativity in players and identify moments of creative flair. However, in order to help foster creativity in players, we need to understand what it is and how it is affected. Why do we need focus on producing creative players? Creativity has been described as the process of developing original ideas that have value. In many walks of life, there is now a distinct movement towards the development of creativity. The reason for this is pretty simple. In our rapidly developing world we need people that can respond to the changing environment. We need people who can find elegant and effective solutions to completely unpredictable events. We don’t know what’s just around the corner. All we actually know about the future is that we know nothing. That’s why so many people in business and commerce are focussed on the need to nurture creativity. The same is true in football. Creative players are those who produce an original skill to meet a completely unpredictable situation in a game. Often in football a moment of skill is not planned, it just ‘appears’ when it is needed. In fact, in football creativity is a double edged sword. As well as helping players provide solutions to unpredictable situations, it also helps them present unique and unpredictable challenges to the opposition. So, why is it that some players are incredibly creative and others are much less creative? Is creativity something people are born with or is it a product of the environment? Can coaching have an effect on a player’s creativity? The weight of opinion amongst experts in this field is that creativity is something people are born with, it is not taught. So does that mean we cannot coach it? Let’s clarify this. Creativity is something we are born with. In fact, creativity is something that everyone is born with. As human beings we are inherently creative. Creativity and imagination are built into every one of us from birth. It doesn’t need to be taught. Picasso said that we are all born artists…the challenge is to remain an artist as we grow up Therefore, in order to nurture creativity we don’t have to find a way of ‘developing’, ‘teaching’ or ‘producing it’. As coaches, our job is simply to allow it to naturally live and grow. We simply have to take away any barriers that might stop it from flourishing. Unfortunately, much of what is done in coaching and educational environments actually has the effect of stifling creativity. “In the first 2 years of life, a child learns to walk and talk….then they are sent to school and told to sit down and shut up”. In society we are schooled not to make mistakes. Our system of education and coaching often reflects this. How many soccer coaches have you heard instructing children not to make mistakes? In [...]

By | January 23rd, 2015|Categories: Soccer Stories|